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A Decade on a Dock: Musings of a Single Mother before Marriage Part 1

July 24, 2014
on the dock, standing tall

on the dock, standing tall

 

This recent self portrait represents who I have often wanted the world to see when they look at me: heroic, larger than life, capable, confident, and self reliant for starters. My convoluted sense of who I believed I needed everyone to think I was started to take shape almost exactly a decade ago as my journey to becoming a parent, on my own, began.

I remember standing on the end of that very same dock asking the “Lady of the Lake” as I call her, if I was ready to become a parent on my own? I had come to this little cabin for a solo weekend in June 2004, with gobs of paperwork to complete to submit to the adoption agency the following week. I knew that this was the one place that I could listen truthfully to my own fears, and leave my doubts at the bottom of the lake if I decided to say yes. I had been coming here since I was seven.  It is my spiritual home.

I showed up at the lake with a little more than a change of clothes, a jar of instant coffee, and my favorite pen. In the plastic bag that I had bawled up in the bottom of my backpack was my secret: a full length fleece bear costume for an infant-size six to twelve months.  By the end of the night, I would be dancing around the cabin in front of the fireplace rocking my imaginary child back and forth. I had placed a towel inside the onesie to give it some heft. I wanted to know what that little body would feel like in my arms. I was intoxicated with the possibility.

Like Athena popping out of her father Zeus’s head in full armor and ready to go, my single mother persona emerged from the dock certain that I could prove to the world, I had what it took to be a stellar parent all by myself. I probably fell in love with my potential and my image of my single motherhood that night. I knew I was crazy to do this on my own.  I just didn’t know how crazy. I imagined that it would be hard, and expensive, and lonely, and confusing too. But I also believed that I had mothering and loving to give to a child in a fierce way. My determination and commitment to make the  transformation from single woman to single mother was in motion, and there was no turning back.

Each time a friend or parent seemed the least bit questioning of my decision to adopt, I would get bigger, not smaller. I would smile wide, and offer them a chance to come help out when the baby arrived. I put together the crib by myself, and bought a big freezer for all the food I had asked my friends to make for me when the time came. I interviewed day care centers, and pediatricians.  I read books, prayed, and sought out others who came before me. I had purpose. I was reinventing myself for a higher calling.  I was ready.

Becoming a mother was not something I did in partnership, like most do. Becoming a single mother meant that I didn’t need a partner. I convinced everyone, and especially me, that I was so capable, and so gigantic that I didn’t need a partner to do this. I had many close friends who made up our chosen family. At least three times a week friends arrived with meals, encouragement and open arms to hold Sammy while I got a shower, or a much needed run around the boulevard. As he grew, and our family grew to include Marcel my network grew too.  I was parenting, blogging, teaching full time, working out,  accepting interviews, and speaking engagements. I was all that.

Once, I had a friend tell me in secret from the other side of the playground; “my husband is worried that if I spend too much time with you, I’ll start to think I’d be better off on my own…” I had to keep myself from agreeing, because I really did think her husband was probably right, and I liked the guy a lot.  Daycare providers, teachers, doctors, parents, and coaches knew that I was flying solo, and that was just fine. With each successful milestone passed, I grew more and more into my role. So much so, that to an extent  I was not Sam’s mom, or Marcel’s mom, I was “Catherine the single mother who makes it look easy…”  I had a lot at stake at keeping up that image, but little to no understanding of  what I was letting go of in the process: the chance to open my heart to a loving romantic partnership.

Sure, I dated a few times in the last few years. I drew wonderful people towards me and the boys. But I had no business doing so. To say I wasn’t ready would be false. I was to busy celebrating my own daily accomplishments, and those of my kids. Every letter from the tooth fairy, or successful parent teacher conference and I deserved a gold star. I was amazing. Who could possibly add up.

Then I met Shrek.

Becoming an almost  married person,  I am discovering, is not something one can do alone. In the next few weeks, leading up to the wedding I am hoping to shed a little more light on just how complex and powerful, and yes radical an act it is for me to agree and want to be married. When we were at the lake a few weeks ago, Shrek called out from the grill where he was creating yet another magnificent feast for the boys and I; “Maybe you can be a married single mother?” To be continued…

Morning coffee delivery

Morning coffee delivery: Looking at you Shrek

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. July 24, 2014 11:59 pm

    Wow! So honest! Thank you for being such an awesome force as well as a self-reflective genius!
    Shrek rules as well!

  2. July 25, 2014 2:47 am

    Catherine,
    This is a wonderful, honest and heartfelt piece. Thank you for sharing such authentic words with the world. You are a remarkable woman and just as you have navigated being a single mother you will surely embrace the amazing ride of marriage. And what a ride it is! Enjoy the journey and thanks again.
    With love and gratitude,
    Marsha

  3. Glenn Picher permalink
    July 26, 2014 2:48 am

    Catherine, this is just a really lovely memento of experiencing the changes that can be wrought from the kind of positive partnership that really helps a soul get out of its own way– discovering itself, and the beloved, anew. People have different regard and reactions to traditional scriptures and other wisdom writings, so not everybody may understand or appreciate the connection that for me surfaced from what you wrote here to Matthew 10:39. For many years I have carried a well worn business card in my wallet with a somewhat unusual English translation of that verse, from the 1970 edition of the New American Bible: “He who seeks only himself brings himself to ruin, whereas he who brings himself to nought for me discovers who he is.” (Most other translations refer to losing one’s life and gaining it.) Inasmuch as it makes sense to anyone to say that our love with a partner mirrors our love with the Divine, I think you’re writing about the same rediscovery as Matthew.

    • July 27, 2014 10:12 am

      Glenn,
      As comments go on a blog post this really shook my foundation. I have read it over and over and came away with several things. First, I was humbled that you took the time to craft it. Then I felt as if my writing was really getting through, and communicating effectively, but beyond what I hoped which is the ultimate intent… But mostly I really saw this as an endorsement from someone who knows me/us so well of where D and I are today on this journey. Thank you for all of it.

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